Hay Report - 19 May 2017

National Summary

  • There were limited changes to the hay prices again this week with a slow market being reported by most hay traders around the country. Both demand and prices were seemingly on the verge of increase in recent weeks (as is expected at this time of year), but this pressure has been quelled again by incoming rain across the entire eastern seaboard.
  • There continues to be terrific supply for cereal hay in most regions and while the quality does vary farm to farm, most shedded feed is average or better. Any hay left in paddock at this point should be treated with caution as the majority will be useless. The silage produced this year was also notoriously poor and a number of farmers are now looking for protein hay as an alternative for thinning supplies. Lucerne is generating the most attention as decent vetch continues to be hard to find.
  • With a good autumn break having now hit much of the country farmers will be buoyed by a positive outlook in terms of fodder security. Hay traders and growers on the other hand may have to endure this lull in trading for some months.
  • As always, we advocate acquiring a feed test and mold and yeast test when purchasing fodder this year. Be sure to use a trusted supplier and inspect the product carefully before purchase.

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Hay Report - 12 May 2017

National Summary

  • Hay trading around the country continued at a relatively slow pace this week with a low demand being reported by hay traders.
  • A small lift was noted in enquiry in the south as farmers look ahead, assessing their fodder requirements for the remainder of the year. Prices firmed in some regions as a result of this stirring, the first sign of activity in weeks from a long stagnated market. There continues to be an oversupply of fodder however, and poorer quality feed is particularly difficult to move.
  • Northern regions continued to have the greater appetite for purchased feed, but still demand hasn’t returned to the levels it reached pre-cyclone Debbie. Supply remains an issue in the north, but recent rain has delayed action for some by providing new grass feed and ultimately a more positive outlook.
  • With the amount of hay that’s experienced weather damage, we continue to advocate the value of getting a feed test, and mould and yeast tests before purchase.

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Hay Report - 28 April 2017

National Summary

  • There were no major changes to hay prices this week as a slow market continued and farmers showed minimal interest in purchased fodder.
  • Whilst demand in the north has slowed with the rest of the nation, supply is still under pressure after a generally poor season for hay making. This could see a steady increase in prices over the coming weeks as buyers compete for what’s remaining.
  • To the south, more widespread rainfall is keeping any interest in purchased feed to a minimum. Southern growers continue to report difficulty in moving hay and a general oversupply, particularly for lower quality feed, is being reported by hay traders. With the autumn break now upon them, it’s unlikely we’ll see a major lift in demand for some time.
  • With the amount of hay that’s experienced weather damage, we continue to advocate the value of getting a feed test, and mould and yeast tests before purchase.

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Hay Report - 21 April 2017

National Summary

  • The hay market remains in a very subdued state again this week around the regions with little trading and at best, marginal demand.
  • Supply in the north is still under pressure although the final impact caused by the recent cyclone has yet to be fully realised.
  • Southern growers continue to report great difficulty finding fodder buyers with an oversupply keeping the market at a passive state for the following month at least. For southern buyers, there continues to be opportunities to pick up fodder at good prices although quality should be carefully considered with respect to price.
  • The largest qualification on short-term demand at this time is the magnitude of any autumn break and any prolonged dry periods heading into the winter months.If autumn rains fail to materialise, demand could quickly increase and supplies of high quality fodder quickly diminished.
  • With the amount of hay that’s experienced weather damage, we continue to advocate the value of getting a feed test, and mould and yeast tests before purchase.

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Hay Report - 7 April 2017

National Summary

  • The hay market remained relatively quiet around the nation this week with little trading done in most regions.
  • Supply in the north is still under pressure with the level of demand far exceeding what’s available locally. From now, any hay purchased in the northern regions is likely to be coming from South Australia, Northern Victoria, or central New South Wales. Rainfall caused by the recent cyclone has eased this demand somewhat but prices continued to rise in response to the growing freight costs.
  • Southern growers on the other hand continue to report great difficulty selling fodder. In a total contrast to the north, the oversupply for hay is expected to keep the market at a crawl for the following month at least. For southern buyers there continues to be opportunities to pick up fodder at good prices. With the amount of hay that’s experienced weather damage however, we recommend requesting a feed test and mould and yeast tests before purchase.

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Hay Report - 24 February 2017

National Summary

  • There were no major changes to hay prices this week with a mostly slow hay market being reported around the nation.
  • While there has been a notable lift in interest and enquiry, particularly in dry northern regions, growers and hay traders are reportedly struggling to find genuine buyers for fodder. The reason for the lull in hay buying is the abundant supply of home-grown fodder experienced by most. A strong 2016 winter has upped most farmers’ fodder production and instilled confidence in many going into 2017.
  • There continues to be terrific opportunities for farmers to pick up good value fodder, and so we recommend potential buyers to assess their feed requirements for the coming year.
  • Weather damaged hay is prevalent throughout the country however and we would suggest careful inspection of fodder, using only a trusted supplier and obtaining a mould and yeast test to ensure quality.

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Hay Report - 10 February 2017

National Summary

  • This week we heard further reports of a drying north, a saturated west and a mostly slow south for hay trading.
  • The growing contrast between northern and southern regions continued to intensify as another week of scorching temperatures lifts interest from farmers in the north. Comments suggest that without significant rainfall soon, supply will run thin over the course of the year. Good volumes of fodder are now being transported around these regions to meet a rising demand.
  • Hay quality continues to be an issue around the nation. Recent heavy rainfall in the west and throughout some southern regions has damaged large stretches of fodder sitting in paddocks.  Obtaining mould and yeast tests will be particularly valuable this season.
  • Despite growing demand for some areas, hay prices remained mostly steady this week. Farmers are urged to evaluate feed requirements and take advantage of the current good prices if possible.  

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Hay Report - 20 January 2017

National Summary

  • Once again this week there were only low levels of hay trading reported around the country. The abundance of new season fodder in most regions has created a positive outlook for farmers and caused them to hold off on buying. Many farmers have also produced well above average stocks of on farm hay and silage which is adding to the lack of urgency to buy.
  • We did see some prices ease this week as more product is added to the already saturated market. Reports indicate that feed made later in the season is in some cases of better quality, but weather damaged, poor quality hay is still most common.
  • Hay traders don’t expect a major lift in buying for some weeks, until home grown fodder stocks are utilised and pasture becomes less available.

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